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Michael Paul Chan (2016)

Michael Paul Chan is an American television and film actor. He is known for his role as Lieutenant Michael Tao on the TNT series The Closer and Major Crimes. Chan was born in San Francisco, California. His television work has included roles like Judge Lionel Ping on Arrested Development, Detective Ron Lu on Robbery Homicide Division, the voice of Jimmy Ho on The PJ's, Mr. Chong on The Wonder Years, a Japanese investor in the 1990 Northern Exposure episode "Dreams, Schemes and Putting Greens", an agent of the C.I.A. on a 2011 episode of The Simpsons, and roles on shows like Bones, Babylon 5, and Young and the Restless. One of his more notable film roles was as the convenience store owner in the 1993 film Falling Down, where he refused to give a discount to Michael Douglas' character when he attempted to purchase a can of soda to get change for the pay telephone outside the store. Another was as Data's father in The Goonies. He appeared in both of Joel Schumacher's Batman movies, in two different roles: a Wayne Enterprises executive in Batman Forever, and Dr. Lee in Batman & Robin. Other films in his filmography include Americanese, Megiddo: The Omega Code 2, U.S.

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About the Michael Paul Chan Interview

Hi all. My name is Michael Paul Smith. I recreate my hometown of Elgin Park at 1/24th scale size using hand-made models and die-cut model cars.

The buildings are constructed of resin-coated paper, styrene plastic, and basswood, plus numerous found objects. The vehicles are diecast models from my own collection of 300+!

No Photoshop is used in my images; they're all composed in the camera. It is the oldest trick in the special effects book: lining up a model with an appropriate background, then photographing it.

I'm here today to talk about my work, my life, or anything you want to know. So, Ask Me Anything!

Proof and you can check out my website here.

Just so you know, volunteer moderator /u/courtiebabe420 is helping me over the phone today.

Michael Paul Chan Jan 21, 2016